Analysis of an experiment

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Tdarcos
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Analysis of an experiment

Post by Tdarcos » Sat May 23, 2020 6:02 pm

A scientist takes a look at the world, then makes a hypotheis about the world, then conducts an experiment to confirm, or refute, that hypothesis. So let's take a look at an experiment I did.

I have mentioned I've been triple incommunicado for at least the better part of a week since I came back to room 330 and bed 330B. No computer, no desk phone, no cell phone. After I bitched enough tines I get my computer back. Disassembled. And the table I can put it on is not in reach. Finally I get one of the aides here to move the table the lousy fucking 3 feet so I can set it up. So I get the computer on the white surge suppressor, monitor plugged in and connected, USB hub Velcroed to my table reconnected (the other USB hub that has the wireless adapter is still connected) and evrything works. As soon as I was able to get on-line I broke "radio silence" and started posting again.

But I'm still missing the desk phone and can't charge my cell phone. Nor the extra (new) phone (which disappears.). Nor my tablet. Apparently the charger is bad. (Three devices won't charge, including two that were kown to work? Puts the suspicion on the charger.)

As I noted here before, I "bit the bullet" and spent roughly $22 for a new phone and new charger, providing me with a "known-good state" to start out.

As promised, the new phone arrived about two days after I ordered it. The phone has some residual charge, about 30% or so, so I know the phone works. I plug it in the charger, which is plugged into the black extension cord, which itself is plugged into the white one. This conceivably gives more room to reach. After a while, the new phone has 100% charge. This confirms the charger works.

Now comes the first experiment. I try plugging the tablet in, by moving the cord to reach it. A few hours later, it's still dead. I haven't dropped or misused the tablet, it should still work.

New experiment: confirm the charger still works. Run the new phone (web surfing or something, no sim card so I can't use it to place calls) so it's down to 90%, then recharge. A while later, I check: 89%. I move the table out of the way, then lower the bed and check. Sure enough, the charge block is unplugged (but the USB cable, surprisingly, is still attached.) Move the black extension cord so it's closer. Plug the charger back in, go up and plug the new phone back in, and after a while, it's back at 100%.

New experiment: Try the tablet. Charges to 100% and the tablet works.

New experiment: Now the big one. Plug the old phone in. Charges to 100%. I call my sister to let her know why I was incommunicado, so I know the old phone works. Seems she wasn't worried, the staff here have been giving her updates.

Results of my experiments: proved conclusively the charger I was given was defective, and that my equipment is in working order. The experiment was a success.

And this really is similar to the sort of thing scientists and researchers do. Make hypotheses, and test them, and maybe discover you're wrong. And, when the "known good" charger wasn't working I suspected test equipment failure rather
than the device going bad after one use, and I was correct.
This signature is limited to 128 characters, or I could have said a few more things. Like, do you know who killed JFK? it was...

TSummary

Re: Analysis of an experiment

Post by TSummary » Sat May 23, 2020 6:19 pm

Tdarcos wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 6:02 pm
A scientist takes a look at the world, then makes a hypotheis about the world, then conducts an experiment to confirm, or refute, that hypothesis. So let's take a look at an experiment I did.

I have mentioned I've been triple incommunicado for at least the better part of a week since I came back to room 330 and bed 330B. No computer, no desk phone, no cell phone. After I bitched enough tines I get my computer back. Disassembled. And the table I can put it on is not in reach. Finally I get one of the aides here to move the table the lousy fucking 3 feet so I can set it up. So I get the computer on the white surge suppressor, monitor plugged in and connected, USB hub Velcroed to my table reconnected (the other USB hub that has the wireless adapter is still connected) and evrything works. As soon as I was able to get on-line I broke "radio silence" and started posting again.

But I'm still missing the desk phone and can't charge my cell phone. Nor the extra (new) phone (which disappears.). Nor my tablet. Apparently the charger is bad. (Three devices won't charge, including two that were kown to work? Puts the suspicion on the charger.)

As I noted here before, I "bit the bullet" and spent roughly $22 for a new phone and new charger, providing me with a "known-good state" to start out.

As promised, the new phone arrived about two days after I ordered it. The phone has some residual charge, about 30% or so, so I know the phone works. I plug it in the charger, which is plugged into the black extension cord, which itself is plugged into the white one. This conceivably gives more room to reach. After a while, the new phone has 100% charge. This confirms the charger works.

Now comes the first experiment. I try plugging the tablet in, by moving the cord to reach it. A few hours later, it's still dead. I haven't dropped or misused the tablet, it should still work.

New experiment: confirm the charger still works. Run the new phone (web surfing or something, no sim card so I can't use it to place calls) so it's down to 90%, then recharge. A while later, I check: 89%. I move the table out of the way, then lower the bed and check. Sure enough, the charge block is unplugged (but the USB cable, surprisingly, is still attached.) Move the black extension cord so it's closer. Plug the charger back in, go up and plug the new phone back in, and after a while, it's back at 100%.

New experiment: Try the tablet. Charges to 100% and the tablet works.

New experiment: Now the big one. Plug the old phone in. Charges to 100%. I call my sister to let her know why I was incommunicado, so I know the old phone works. Seems she wasn't worried, the staff here have been giving her updates.

Results of my experiments: proved conclusively the charger I was given was defective, and that my equipment is in working order. The experiment was a success.

And this really is similar to the sort of thing scientists and researchers do. Make hypotheses, and test them, and maybe discover you're wrong. And, when the "known good" charger wasn't working I suspected test equipment failure rather
than the device going bad after one use, and I was correct.
In this thread, Tdarcos explains in great detail how he used the scientific method to determine that his non-functional phone charger was unplugged.

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Tdarcos
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Re: Analysis of an experiment

Post by Tdarcos » Sat May 23, 2020 8:27 pm

TSummary wrote:
Sat May 23, 2020 6:19 pm
In this thread, Tdarcos explains in great detail how he used the scientific method to determine that his non-functional phone charger was unplugged.
And as usual, you got it backwards. The functional charger became unplugged, the non-functional one was plugged in the wall the entire time. Didn't you read the article?
This signature is limited to 128 characters, or I could have said a few more things. Like, do you know who killed JFK? it was...

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