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Comparison itching Translate and Google Translate

Posted: Tue Sep 24, 2019 7:57 am
by Tdarcos
Jolt Country was probably down at the time, so I had posted the following at 09/12/2019, 12:52pm PDT on Caltrops, but I have an update. So here's the original posting :

In Arthur Hailey's book,The Evening News, a group operated by the terrorist organization Sendero Luminoso, known in English as the Shining Path, have some hostages held prisoner who have escaped. The leader of the group addresses the henchmen and a woman, and is very upset. He speaks to them, in Spanish, expressing his anger, and Hailey repeats it, in Spanish. Well, Amazon Kindle, which is how I was reading the book. has Bing translate integrated into it, at least when it works. Otherwise, I use Google translate. What's interesting is how both of them translated the phrase.

The phrase was: “¡Maldita escoria, imbéciles inservibles! Por su estupidez … ¡Nunca vigilar! ¡Solo dormir y tomar! ¡Sin cuidar! … los presos de mierda se escaparon."

Bing translated it as ""Damn scum, useless assholes! For your stupidity ... never watch! Just sleep and drink! No care! ... The fucking prisoners escaped."
Google translated it as: “Damn scum, useless morons! For his stupidity ... Never watch! Just sleep and drink! Without caring! ... the shit prisoners escaped. "

Now the thing is, based on context and delivery, I thing Bing got it mostly right. The only one I think Google did better on was the phrase "Without caring."

So, to quote Admiral Anderson from the movie Crimson Tide, "but in so far as the letter ... is concerned, you were both right - and you were also both wrong." Amazingly, Bing was much less wrong than Google.
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Today I heard a radio advertisement for Software AG, and I know enough to know "AG" is an abbreviation for a German type of business. So I went to Wikipedia and found out, the way "inc" is an abbreviation for "incorporated," AG is the appreciation for the German term "Aktiengesellschaft " (for the curious it's pronounced act-tell-Jen-shaft) for a corporation having shares.

Bing Translate punted on the word, on translate German-to-English it gives the same word.

Google translate nailed it, responding with "joint-stock company," which is dead-on right.