38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand (article teaser)

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Tdarcos
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38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand (article teaser)

Post by Tdarcos » Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:13 am

38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
To Some of Us, Grammar Feels Personal
By Gyles Brandreth
August 12, 2019

When it comes to American words and phrases creeping into British English, I like to think that I keep my cool and maintain my stiff upper lip. I’m that phlegmatic because I happen to know that “keeping your cool” and “stiff upper lip” are both American in origin. We may now think of the “stiff upper lip”—showing fortitude in the face of adversity and self-restraint in place of quivering-upper-lip emotion—as a quintessentially British attribute, but the phrase originated in America in 1815 and became popular thanks to the success of a poem by the American women’s rights activist Phoebe Cary (1824[?]–1871), which featured the lines “And though hard be the task, / Keep a stiff upper lip.”

The reliable, talented, and influential British journalist Matthew Engel, author of the tremendous That’s the Way It Crumbles: The American Conquest of the English Language, is the acknowledged authority on Americanisms that have successfully invaded British English. The list of them is lengthy—and, as Matthew points out, includes “lengthy,” as well as “reliable,” “talented,” “influential,” and “tremendous”: “All of these words we use without a second thought were not normally part of the English language until the establishment of the United States. The Americans imported English wholesale, forged it to meet their own needs, then exported their own words back across the Atlantic to be incorporated in the way we speak over here. Those seemingly innocuous words caused fury at the time. The poet Coleridge denounced “talented” as a barbarous word in 1832, though a few years later it was being used by William Gladstone. A letter-writer to The Times, in 1857, described “reliable” as vile.”

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"Shirt them a-tear up, trousers is gone/don't want to end up like Bonnie and Clyde."
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Tdarcos
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Re: 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand (article teaser)

Post by Tdarcos » Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:25 am

Oh, at the bottom of thd article, there is an audio track, where the author reads it. I didn't realize the author was a man until I heard his British accent reading this article. It's quite a treat.
"Shirt them a-tear up, trousers is gone/don't want to end up like Bonnie and Clyde."
-Desmond Dekker, The Israelites

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RealNC
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Re: 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand (article teaser)

Post by RealNC » Thu Aug 15, 2019 11:22 am

Call your bloody language "American". There is no "British English". That's just a word you invented to describe English when spelled and pronounced properly.

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