The Art of Refrigerator Repair

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Flack
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The Art of Refrigerator Repair

Post by Flack » Sun May 07, 2017 2:33 pm

When I say I don't know anything about refrigerators, what I really mean is I don't know any more about refrigerators than the average third grader. I understand refrigerators are colder on the inside than the outside, that one section gets colder than the other, and that the light inside turns off when you close the door. Probably.

Our current house came with the previous owner's refrigerator. It's a GE something-or-other, with side-by-side doors and a stainless steel finish. Our old refrigerator was creme in color, with some sort of textured finish, so we decided to keep the newer one and left our old one behind when we sold our old house. This is created a ripple effect in the real estate industry that will be felt for generations.

It feels like the new side-by-side refrigerator has less storage space, and the stainless steel finish, while trendy, means magnets no longer stick to it, the new fridge has two features that the old one did not -- one, it can create crushed ice (as well as the non-crushed variety), and two, it has a water/ice dispenser right in the door.

I imagine that with every invention of convenience, there's a generation of people who scoff and wonder why said invention was necessary. Our first VCR didn't even come with a remote. Our second one came with a small box with a toggle switch that allowed you to switch between PLAY and PAUSE. It wasn't wireless; it had an eight-foot cable that connected it to the VCR. I can only imagine the eyerolls from people who owned older VCRs upon seeing that wired remote for the first time.

I say that to say that I never saw opening the freezer door to be an insurmountable obstacle any time I wanted to get ice. I just opened the freezer door, got some ice, and closed the door. The water dispenser is even less impressive to me. Our kitchen has an island with a water faucet. Between the cabinet where we store our cups and the refrigerator, there are none one, but two things that dispense water. I get that the water that comes out of the fridge is filtered, but c'mon. When I was a kid I drank water from garden hoses and deep throated water fountains at school like I was starring in Behind the Green Door.

So where was I going with this? Oh, yes -- six months ago, the ice maker stopped working. Last month, the water dispenser in the door stopped working. Everyone looked to me to fix these things, which is really pointless because I really don't care if they ever work again. If the freezer stops keeping the Tombstone pizzas frozen, or if the other size stops cooling the milk and beer, I'd be all over it. The fact that there are only two places to get water instead of three in the kitchen hasn't exactly spurred me to action.

After four minutes on YouTube, my wife decided the problem was the water filter so she went to Home Depot and bought one. The water filter was $49.96. It did not solve the problem. In fiction, we call this introducing a ticking clock. I realized that I needed to fix the refrigerator before she replaced the entire thing, one $50 piece at a time.

Project #1: fix the water dispenser.

I found a video on YouTube where a guy explains the water dispensing system. Water comes in the back, flows around to the front, up the inside of the door, and to the dispenser. When we installed the water filter, water sprayed out everywhere, so I knew water was getting to that point. According to the video, the next thing to check was a quick-jack connection underneath the front of the fridge. I got down and found mine looked like something that had been on the bottom of the ocean for 200 years. The guy on the video cut his wires, bypassed the small connector, and soldered the wires together. I did the same.

Water came out. Project #1: SOLVED.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lSltQaxbhE[/youtube]

Project #2: Fix the ice maker.

I watched a different video on how to fix ice makers. There were four steps. The first step said to check and make sure there was water. I did that. Step two involves turning everything off, letting anything frozen thaw out, and turning it back on. I did that, too. Step three involves a weird ritual of flipping switches and turning things off and on to run some sort of diagnostics. If the ice maker doesn't work after that, and mine does not, step four involves ordering a new ice maker.

I have ordered a new ice maker. Not for me, but for the other three people in this house.

UPDATE PENDING.
"Jack Flack always escapes." -Davey Osborne

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Flack
Posts: 6193
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2008 3:02 pm
Location: Oklahoma
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Post by Flack » Sat May 27, 2017 1:37 pm

Project #2: Fix the ice maker.

Before the ice maker arrived, I found a couple of other things to test. I tested them. They were fine.

The refrigerator repairman brought out the new ice maker and confirmed my tests. The total bill was $300.

Since I paid the bill, I demanded that I get the first ice cube.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67xQDJ3WFgY[/youtube]

Project #2: Complete!

This has been part 2/2 of REFRIGERATOR REPAIR.
"Jack Flack always escapes." -Davey Osborne

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