Breaking Bad: The Journey Journal

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Post by Flack » Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:55 pm

pinback wrote:Have you ever watched a show this quickly, Flack? Do you feel it has addictive qualities?
The only other show I have watched at this pace was Lost. According to this post, I watched all 121 episodes of Lost in 9 weeks. That's 121 episodes in 63 days, or almost exactly 2 a day.

I started watching Breaking Bad on August 1st. Today's August 11th, and I watched episode 22 (S03E02) earlier today so, my pace is almost identical.

My goal is to get caught up so I can watch the season and series finale live with you guys. That should be eight weeks from tomorrow, so I think I'm good. If I did the math right, I've got to watch 36 episodes in 56 days. Slightly more than 2 a day, but that's why God created weekends.

When I watched Lost, I had downloaded every episode and was watching them at home. Seasons 1-4 of Breaking Bad are on Netflix, which means I can watch them on my laptop, iPad, iPhone, or television. It gives me a lot more options. If the kids are watching TV, I can watch an episode on my iPad. I've been watching roughly one episode each night on the iPad. I'm hoping this new platform portability allows me to keep up the pace.
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Post by Flack » Sat Aug 11, 2012 10:55 pm

S03E03 - "I.F.T."

Never a show to ease into things, a couple of minutes into this episode we find out who cut off Tortuga's head, and now the twins of terror have a name: the "Cousins". Right after we see Tortuga's head being removed the opening credits roll and announce special guest star Danny Trejo. This may be the first time in history a guest star was beheaded before his name appeared in the opening credits. Let's hope, anyhow.
cleaner didn't call saul. mum's the word.

Walt takes Saul's advice and calls Skyler's bluff by moving back in to his own house. Skyler's bluff is called when she calls the police, but refuses to turn Walt in. Everybody is turning on Skyler. Walt Jr. doesn't understand, and Marie and Hank think she's being to harsh. Her only recourse is to sleep with her boss, Ted. She's either desperate for attention and affection or is simply doing it to either hurt Walt or get him to sign the divorce papers.

Why don't these things happen to me? I wish I were a supervisor at work with women working under me -- and, women working "under" me, wocka wocka wocka!

Gus had a meeting with the cousins, Uncle Tio, and El Jefe (not El Jefe from The Three Amigos -- a different one). The cartel told Gus they want Heisenberg dead, and there may be little Gus can do about it. No one man is bigger than the operation as a whole. It will be interesting to see if Gus has the ability to protect or hide Walt from the cousins. I suspect he can ... for three months, if Walt takes his offer.
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Post by Flack » Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:14 pm

S03E04 - "Green Light"

Jesus, Christ. Walt is melting down, isn't he.

There's a look on Walt's face -- and Jesus, this guy is a good actor -- but there's this look, right after Walt makes a move on his boss and right before he gets fired, his look of sick enjoyment and ... it's almost like he's pleased with what a horrible person he's become. It's sickening.

For three seasons we've watched Walt badger Jesse into cooking when he didn't want to; suddenly, Jesse's the one ready to cook now, without Walt. He baked a pound of meth using Walt's personal recipe, one Walt taught to Jesse, and Walt didn't take to kindly to it. Walt went ape shit and said he deserved half of the profits. Later in the episode he actually *gets* half of the profits. It's Gus' henchman who delivers the cash, but ... why? Who set up this deal? It had to go through Saul, right? Is Saul making trying to get the band back together? It would seem so.

Hank got called to return to El Paso, but blew it off in search of Jesse's RV. Hank's freak-outs are getting worse. He was able to hide them for a while, but after blowing up at Marie and blowing up at his partner ... they're getting worse. Most telling was the almost identical scene Hank shared with Walt; this time it was Hank, looking at his own distorted reflection in a broken mirror. I can't imagine anyone likes what they see in the mirror at this point. Does anyone on this show tell the truth, ever? Gahd, it wouldn't surprise me to learn Walt Jr's been faking having cerebral palsy at this point!!

Really where we're at in the show at this point is, Walt and Jesse have lost what's most important to them (family and Jane, respectively). We'll just have to see if the two of them can patch things up and get moving before Hank and the DEA close in.
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Post by Flack » Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:26 pm

S03E05 - "Mas"

More.

After trying to get out of the game, Gus tells Walt he needs more. Underneath his industrial laundry compound, Gus has built Walt a state of the art meth lab. All he needs is Walter Wonka to work there for three months and supervise the Oompa Loompas.

There are a lot of people against Walt in this show, but the newest one is Jesse. It looks like the two will go head to head in the meth game. If it's Jesse versus Walt and Gus, Jesse will lose. He might be able to go back to selling ounces at a time -- something he seemed more comfortable with, to be honest -- but moving pounds at a time isn't going to happen in that town without the major players allowing it.

The scene in the strip club with Jesse blowing Walt's RV money was priceless. Now we know the history of the RV -- it was Combo's mother's, and it's stolen. From Hank's police work we know there are only around 30 of them in ABQ, so I'm sure an APB on this thing will eventually turn it up. Hopefully Jesse's not cooking in it at the time.

After interviewing Combo's mother, Hank spots the picture of Combo with Jesse. Hank needs the Heisenberg bust to redeem himself after refusing to go to El Paso and watching Gomey go in his place. The heat is on.

This episode ended with Walt leaving the White home with his bag of money and the divorce papers signed. It would appear the time limit for his offer has been exceeded.

Ladies and gentlemen ... it's time to cook.
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Post by Flack » Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:35 am

S03E06 - "Sunset"

(Watching episodes while waiting for the clouds to pass so I can see the meteor shower tonight.)

After a couple of so/so episodes -- I mean, they're all good, but not all of them move the plot forward -- we get two in a row that, HOO HAH, shit's moving now, ain't it!

Episode begins with Walt granting the divorce and getting his own place. Walt has apparently accepted Gus' three month offer. Walter shows up to his first day of work and meets his new lab assistant, a 180 degree turn from Pinkman. The new lab assistant has a master's degree in chemistry. Hell, I'm not even sure if Jesse has a high school diploma! This new assistant appears to be the beginning of a beautiful relationship.

With Jesse getting into the game, he drags Badger and Skinny Pete back into it with him. Badger ... wow, did he really just do a Riverdance? Little do our friends know Hank is staking out the joint. Hank calls Walt to ask about Jesse's RV. Walk makes a run to the RV to have it destroyed, but before he can, Badger calls Jesse who inadvertently leads Hank right to it. I'm not sure why Walt hung up on Jesse. Did he think Jesse wouldn't believe him? Or was he afraid the line wasn't safe?

The exchange with Hank attempting to gain access to the RV with Jesse and Walt inside was one of the most tense moments of the series so far. Hank dragging the crowbar down the side of the RV reminded me of Freddy Krueger scraping his blades down a wall.

Eventually Walt does what everybody on this show should do anytime they get in trouble, and calls Saul. Saul's assistant makes a prank call to Hank, telling him his wife Marie is being airlifted to the hospital after being in an accident. With the coast clear, Walt and Jesse make their escape, and the RV makes it into the trash dumpster.

When Hank realized he had been had, I thought he was going to turn into the Incredible Hulk. Grrr!

The Cousin's arc continues. Instead of killing people, they are now staging a sit in at Gus' restaurant, and refusing to eat while they are there. Gus eventually agrees to meet with them at Sundown (indicative of a showdown) and gives them permission to go after the DEA Agent that killed Tuco: Hank Schrader. Apparently Hank didn't have to go to El Paso to find trouble. Trouble is now looking for him.

Awesome, awesome episode.
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Post by Flack » Sun Aug 12, 2012 8:02 am

S03E07 - "One Minute"

Well I was right, Hank DID turn into the Hulk last episode. He drove right across town and Hulked out on Jesse's Face! Wow, Jesse ends up at the hospital, with Saul (perhaps literally) chasing the ambulance. At the hospital, things get even nastier between Jesse and Walt. Jesse tells Walt he plans on suing Hank and the DEA and continuing to cook meth, with turning in Walt being his "get out of jail free" card. Kid's got a point. Saul, ever helpful, suggests to Walt maybe it's time to off Jesse. I would hate to dig a hole in Albuquerque, there's got to be a body every ten feet or so.

This series is full of great symbolism. The part where Hank has to place his hands on the table so that the investigating officers can take pictures of his knuckles looks just like the stereotypical "hands on the hood" position. Whether it pans out or not, the foreshadowing is there.

This episode began with Tio almost drowning one of the cousins to teach them both a lesson: "familia es todo". Family is everything. Whether family is literal or figurative, we see that theme throughout this episode. Twice in this episode, Walt does right. After Skyler emplores Walt to say something to Jesse about the lawsuit against Hank, Walt puts into a series of events by getting rid of his lab partner and swallowing his pride (or at least pretending to) and telling Jesse his meth is as good as his own, eventually leading to a 50/50 partnership between Jesse and Walt, cooking in Gus' state of the art underground lab.

While I don't know I loved Walt's new lab partner, god was that guy perfect for Walt. A guy who loved and respected the chemistry and more or less worshiped Walt. Nice guys finish last in this business.

This was yet another episode full of amazing drama. We watched Hank unravel, going from one poor decision (attacking Jesse) to refusing to lie about the encounter to breaking down in the elevator to a confession to his wife that he's not the man he thought he was, and may be done as a cop. Hank seems to be leading the charge at the force against "Heisenberg," so him taking a leave of absence might give Walt a bit of breathing room.

The show's title comes from the episode's last two minutes. While leaving the police station, Hank receives a mysterious, anonymous call informing him that the cousins are coming and he has one minute to live. Without his firearm at his side, Hank does what any of us would do and ... stick around. What are you doing, Hank? Put that Jeep in drive and GTFO, Schrader! Right on cue, the cousins DO arrive. Hank crushes one with his car and barely manages to off the second one who was carrying an ax, and probably just wanted to talk. (Yeah, right.)

Big unanswered question: who tipped off Hank about the hit? It had to be someone up high enough who knew exactly when it was going down. It was also someone who wanted or needed to hide his identity. Gus knew the cousins were coming for him (he gave them Hank's name) but it's actually better for Gus if Hank's dead, since (a) that's one less DEA Agent on his case, and (b) he essentially offered Hank's blood in exchange for Walt's. Who else would have known? The voice changer makes me think it was Walt, but it doesn't seem like Walt would have known when the hit was going down. Maybe somebody saw the cousins on their way over?

Speaking of the cousins, I was a little disappointed to see them go out how they did. These guys are killing machines. The way they walk and act almost reminds me of Terminators. The cousins are obviously super smart and well trained. From crossing the border to changing their clothes to ... essentially everything they have done has reeked of being trained for this moment. That's why I really don't understand the suicide mission aspect of this hit. Why do it in the DEA's parking lot, out in the open? Couldn't they have hit him at his house, like they almost did Walt? The hit just seemed like sloppy work from two unsloppy guys.

Hank's panic attacks got bad after shooting Tuco, and worse after El Paso. I can't WAIT to see how they are after having two bullets put in him.
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Post by Flack » Sun Aug 12, 2012 3:12 pm

S03E08 - "I See You"

I was wrong. They put four bullets in him, not two.

It appears Gale is out and Jesse is in. When Gale says, "this makes no sense," for the most part, I think we all agree with him. In El Paso Hank was told to keep your friends close and your enemies even closer. Perhaps this is what Walt is up to. Lab tech or no lab tech, Jesse and Walt are now on the hook for 200 pounds of meth a week. Jesse thought he was the man the last time he cooked one pound so ...

The main storyline features Hank in the hospital, along with one of the surviving cousins. Marie has a meltdown in the waiting room, blaming everybody but Hank for Hank getting attacked. She blamed the DEA for taking his gun, his partner for going to El Paso, and Walt for "buying marijuana from that Pinkman kid." She breaks down again in the cafeteria over a dirty fork.

Walt has a weird attention to detail, doesn't he? A couple of episodes ago we saw him fish a lone band-aid out of a swimming pool. This episode we see him fix a wobbly table in the hospital waiting room. He pays great attention to things like that, not so much attention to his family situation. It's a weird detail they're thrown in there.

Both Walt and Gus learn that one of the cousins survives. Walt learns by watching this guy with legless stumps unhook himself from all the IVs and hoses and crawl across the floor at an attempt to ... punch Walt in the kneecaps? The symbolism's there, however. The cartel (or at least Tio's faction) will not stop until either they are dead, or Walt is dead.

I should wait until I've seen the entire episode before typing these. Five minutes later, Gus declared World War III on the Mexican Cartel. El Jefe's dead, the cousins are dead ... the only one left alive is Tio, and you have to think that's not for long. We already knew that Gus was a major player, but there are killers, and then there are killers who kill killers. And that's Gus. Suddenly I am worried about what might happen to Walt and Jesse when their three month contract with Gus is up.

The episode ends with Hank being stabilized, and Walt missing his first deadline with Gus.

We still don't know who tipped of Hank at this point. Did Gus approve the hit on Hank, only to tip off Hank in hopes of putting the cousins out of commission? I don't see who else is in contact both with the cartel and wouldn't want Hank dead more than they wanted the cousins dead.

Why does nobody in ABQ own a smartphone? Seriously. 3 seasons and not one smartphone. Everybody in ABQ has flip phones? Is that a drug thing? Are they all the disposable phones? I can tell you that from a visual standpoint, it is very difficult to emphatically slam a virtual iPhone button.
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Post by Flack » Sun Aug 12, 2012 6:06 pm

S03E09 - "Kafkaesque"

Show begins with a Los Pollos Hermanos commercial segueing into a shot of meth raining down. Awesome. We also get a glimpse into Gus' distribution system. Meth is going is being smuggled into Pollos trucks and redistributed across the southwest.

Jesse has the most forboding forshadowing line of the show, something I was already wondering last episode: "What happens at the end of three months?" By the end of this episode, we know. Walt's been offered an extended deal. He may not like the commitment, but the year-round protection of his family (and his own back) is worth the trade off.

In this episode we see Jesse refusing to grow up. He wants to run with the big dogs, but he doesn't want to pay taxes, he doesn't want to launder his money, and he's unhappy, somehow, over "only" making 1.5 million off the deal. That's like being mad about only making $5/hour at McDonald's, a company that makes billions of dollars every year. Them's the breaks, kid. Through a few glances and hints it appears that Jesse is planning on continuing to sell a bit of product on the side. Whether it's product he makes himself or skims off the top of Gus (a dangerous game, indeed) we're not sure yet.

Can I just say that nurses are the absolute last people you want in a hospital as a patient? Through personal experience I can tell you that it's simply amazing how annoying this situation can be.

Gomez visits Hank in the hospital and shows him a map of the blue meth sales, telling Hank he was right. Hank sloughs it off and says he had no idea this would happen. Hank's got bigger issues than tracking down blue meth -- like the fact that he can't seem to feel his legs at this point.

Walt puts two and two together and figures out what I was wondering last episode. Gus made the call to Hank and intentionally started a border war to dry up the supply of meth south of the border, creating a market for his newly manufactured product. Whether it's cooking chicken or distributing meth, you gotta hand it to Gus.

While temporarily back at the White household, Ted makes a surprise visit to the house. How awkward -- Ted actually thinks he has a chance with Skyler, who obviously wants the best of both worlds (or, at least, will not move forward with Ted for Walt Jr's sake).

While driving back from the lab, Walt speeds up to 90 miles per hour, closes his eyes, and floats over into oncoming traffic. Is this a test of his mortality, or does he really feel like ending it? Is he that upset with himself over Gus' new, extended deal?

The scene with Badger and Skinny Pete crashing the rehab party and talking up the blue meth was hilarious! Announcing the re-arrival of sky blue to a bunch of barely recovering addicts? Genius!!

This episode ended with Marie wanting to go out of pocket to pay for the best physical therapy for Hank, and Skyler offering to pay for it with Walt's "gambling" money. Boy, it's too bad Walt didn't come up with that same story for Skyler -- it's almost believable, and since the rise in popularity of the World Series of Poker, who doesn't love a rogue gambler? Without telling Marie exactly what Walt's been up to, Skyler offers to pay for Hank's PT with Walt's "gambling" money. Skyler has Walt over a barrel and there's not a damn thing he can do about it. What a perfect way to both help Hank and stick it to Walt at the same time.

I got the Kafkaesque reference by the rehab guy (and being incorrectly used later by Jesse and the Stooges), but it really applies to more than just Jesse. It's the entire system of people coming and going, of making meth in a basement lab and shipping it out in chicken trucks. Kafkaesque, indeed.
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Post by Flack » Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:42 am

S03E10 - "Fly"

Sometimes, shortly before or shortly after clicking send on these mini-reviews, I'll hit Google for other people's reviews of the same episode (always careful not to step in any spoilers) to see if I was on or off target with my thoughts. On this episode, I think I was off.

"Fly" reminds me of a movie based on a play. You can always tell them because they have little to no set changes. 99% of "Fly" took place in Gus' underground meth lab. It was one of those episodes that, at least as far as the overall arc of the story is concerned, doesn't affect the plot at all. At the beginning of the episode we have Walt and Jesse making meth in the lab, and an hour later, we have the same thing.

Much of this episode is spent on Walt's obsessive compulsive behavior, which seems to be getting worse. I already mentioned the band-aid and the wobbly table episodes; now it's a fly in the lab that Walt is sure will contaminate the next batch of meth. A couple of times Jesse points out the obvious, that meth is essentially poison for people that don't care about their bodies and that they have the least picky customers ever yo, but Walt's not listening. The opposite of Ahab's great white whale is Walt's tiny black fly.

Ultimately Jesse realizes Walt will not listen to reason and the best approach will be to placate him. To that end he buys an assortment of fly-smattering equipment including flyswatters, sprays, and fly strips.

The episode's only tension came near the end where Walt, drowsy from medication, seems on the verge of confessing to Jesse that he (Walt) watched Jane die and could have saved her, but didn't. Jesse's rage has been slowly building this season; it is not unfathomable to think that after hearing such a confession, the next thing to go into the oven would be Walt.

And yet at the end of the episode we see Jesse precariously balanced on the top of a ladder perched on top of two rolling cabinets relying on a barely conscious Walt to hold things steady.

Walt had an internalizing moment in which he pondered, what would have been the perfect time to die? As a kid I had this theory that I could carry an infinite amount of paper, because no matter how much paper you were carrying, you could always hold one more piece. It reminds me of the old math puzzle that said between "points A and B" there is middle point, so once you get to the middle point there is another middle point between the new A and the original B, and because of this you can really never get anywhere. Walt's speech reminded me of that, as he tried to apply logic to something illogical. Ultimately Walt determines that if he had not left the house the night that Jane died, it would have been perfect. I'm sure Skyler and many others in Walt's life would disagree that THAT was the moment things changed.

Again I think I'm in the minority here when I say I thought this episode was interesting, but not great. Maybe I am just getting antsy to get to the end of season 3.
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Post by pinback » Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:26 am

Ooooh, Robb's not going to like that.
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Post by Ice Cream Jonsey » Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:27 am

It is OK! I thought that "Fly" was the absolute greatest single television show in human history, but that is because I like a lot of the things Flack noted, but didn't care for as much: the play-like structure, the fact that they were in the lab the whole time, and then the tension. THe wonderful, beautiful tension of Walt almost confessing.

Was that the last time Walt was almost completely honest with someone? I mean, he doesn't really get points because he wasn't honest, but still.

Keep in mind that "Fly" also had Aaron Paul at the height of his ass-kicking season of acting. The only reason more superlatives aren't used (I think) is because he happens to be acting with the one guy on the planet better than him at it, now that Heath Ledger is dead and Charlize Theron is not a guy.

Aaron Paul is going to make a shitload of great, transcendent movies starting in three years.
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Post by Flack » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:18 pm

S03E11 - "Abiquiu"

I guess I got my wish. We went from an episode where (in regards to the big picture) very little changed to one where ... wow. Let's recap.

First up, Skyler. Skyler did a 180 in this episode. The last time Skyler and Walt spoke about the drug money, she was indignant that he had made house payments with it; now, she's butting heads with Saul on how to best launder it. We already know she's good with the books (she corrected Ted on a few mistakes), but once again we will see where Walt's loyalty lies -- does he go with Saul's recommendation (the Laser Tag place) or Skyler's (the car wash)?

From a big picture perspective, this kind of changes things from being Walt against the world to Walt and Skyler vs. Marie and Hank. I'll talk more about this at the end of this post.

Jesse had a major, major plot development this week. In a feeble attempt to sell meth to recovering addicts by Badger and Skinny Pete (Badger's only customer so far has been Skinny Pete), Jesse ends up hooking up with Andrea. At first Andrea seemed like a throw away character (a temporary "Jane") but, as often happens in the Breaking Bad universe, we learn that ABQ is a small town and in a pivotal moment we discover that Andrea's 10-year-old gang-banging brother is who murdered Combo!!!

The episode ends with Jesse making a buy from the rival gang (of all the people in ABQ who know who Jesse Pinkman is, it is surprising rival meth dealers do not) and Pinkman getting piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiissed. Jesse is constantly taking one step forwards and two steps back. Just after pulling his dealers off the street and landing a "normal" meth cooking job ("normal" being relative), it suddenly looks like he's contemplating revenge, maybe murder.

More common themes running through this episode. You've got the common theme of Hank and Walt not wanting outside "charity". You've got Walt and Hank and Jesse, all with relationship issues. You've also got random encounters, Walt with Jane's dad and now Jesse with Combo's killer's sister. Small town, that Albuquerque ...

The last interesting and possibly ominous note was Walt's dinner with Gus. Walt looks like he's afraid he might get killed at first until Gus hands him a butcher knife and turns his back on him. (Is this foreshadowing that Walt might stab Gus in the back?) Gus gives Walt the ultimate advice: "don't make the same mistake twice," but he doesn't clarify what he's referring to, and I'm not sure. Is he talking about working with Jesse? Is he talking about lying to Gus on why he was behind on production? Is he talking about something else?
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Post by Flack » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:38 pm

Ice Cream Jonsey wrote:It is OK! I thought that "Fly" was the absolute greatest single television show in human history, but that is because I like a lot of the things Flack noted, but didn't care for as much: the play-like structure, the fact that they were in the lab the whole time, and then the tension. THe wonderful, beautiful tension of Walt almost confessing.

Was that the last time Walt was almost completely honest with someone? I mean, he doesn't really get points because he wasn't honest, but still.

Keep in mind that "Fly" also had Aaron Paul at the height of his ass-kicking season of acting. The only reason more superlatives aren't used (I think) is because he happens to be acting with the one guy on the planet better than him at it, now that Heath Ledger is dead and Charlize Theron is not a guy.

Aaron Paul is going to make a shitload of great, transcendent movies starting in three years.
I should clarify. I thought the acting in this episode was amazing. That moment where Jesse's eyes turned red and started glazing over when Walt mentioned Jane and began digging for anything Jane's dad might have mentioned in that conversation was definitely riveting. This episode was indeed a good reminder of what a great actor this guy is, something that's easy to forget when he's just running around saying "yo" and "bitch" all the time.

Last night while I was waiting for the kids to go to bed so I could watch another episode we ended up watching an episode of George Lopez followed by an episode of My Wife and Kids and I was thinking ... basically George Lopez is just George Lopez being George Lopez, followed by Keenen Ivory Wayans being Keenen Ivory Wayans. When watching Breaking Bad, I don't think about the actors AT ALL. At no point do I see "Hal from Malcom in the Middle" when watching Walt. When I am in those episodes, for 47 minutes, I am IN those episodes. That's definitely a testament to the cast and the acting.
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Post by Flack-iPad » Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:33 pm

I just finished all of season three and also watched the first episode of season four. I will write more when I'm not sitting here in shock.

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Post by pinback » Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:40 pm

Yeah, those were... those were quality episodes. Enjoy them, because Season 5 is pretty terrible.

That was just a joke.
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Post by pinback » Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:49 pm

Also, just so you can feel some vicarious pain through the rest of us:

Imagine those of us watching the show real-time. We watched the end of Season 3, Full Measure, and then had to wait OVER A LITERAL, 365-DAY YEAR before Season 4 started.
Can you imagine?

Can y-- Well, you can probably imagine, but yeah. Brutal.
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Post by Ice Cream Jonsey » Wed Aug 15, 2012 4:25 am

Flack is capable of great imagination. But I am glad that in this, he does not have to use it.

I have been careful not to make comments because I can't remember who gets offed at what point. But man. What an opener. I will say that Season Four is the greatest season. Of anything. I don't get people who compare The Sopranos to this. It's like comparing Seinfeld to Always Sunny.
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Post by Flack » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:24 am

pinback wrote:Imagine those of us watching the show real-time. We watched the end of Season 3, Full Measure, and then had to wait OVER A LITERAL, 365-DAY YEAR before Season 4 started. Can you imagine?
I had enough time Monday night to watch three episodes, but I specifically stopped at two, leaving myself the last two of the season for last night. I figured that the next to last episode would end on a cliff hanger that the last one would resolve and then set up some new stuff for season four.

Last night I set aside enough time to watch two episodes, and after watching the season three closer I IMMEDIATELY had to watch the season four opener. Stupid TV shows. I really can't imagine waiting a year for that episode, especially the way they framed Jesse changing his aim at the last second. More on that ... COMING UP!
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Post by Flack » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:26 am

Ice Cream Jonsey wrote:I don't get people who compare The Sopranos to this. It's like comparing Seinfeld to Always Sunny.
I noticed when Googling some other people's reviews that a lot of people were comparing this show to the Sopranos. "Episode X of Breaking Bad is similar to Episode Y of The Sopranos." When you haven't seen every Sopranos episode, it doesn't much matter.
"Jack Flack always escapes." -Davey Osborne

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Flack
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Post by Flack » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:56 am

S03E12 - "Half Measures"

When Jesse things, everybody's head hurts. Jesse wants -- no, needs -- revenge on the two drug dealers that ordered the hit on Combo, and he's decided the perfect plan is a Ricin sandwich, delivered by the neighborhood crack whore. When Walt refuses to whip up a batch, Jesse makes his own after finding the recipe on the Internet and puts the Ricin on a burger. Everything seems set to go when Mike the Cleaner intervenes and takes Jesse for a ride. At a meeting back at the outskirts of Pollo-town, Jesse not only learns that Walt narc'ed him out to Gus, but that the dealers are Gus' employees, after which Jesse is forced to shake their hands.

Jesse's weak spot appears to be kids (maybe they remind him of his brother, or maybe they remind him of his own childhood; doesn't matter), and when he learns the two drug dealers have killed 11-year-old Tomas, Pinkman loses it.

Gus' advice last episode ("don't make the same mistake twice") seems to be coming back to Walt again. Will he go against Gus (once again) and stick by Jesse (once again)? The answer lies in two places -- the dent in the front of Walt's Aztek from one drug dealer, and a point blank range bullet in the face to the other. Despite Jesse's murderous rage, we keep hearing that he is "not a murderer," a title Walt saved him from earning tonight.

There are a few side-arcs going on in this episode, but by the time the end rolled around, none of them seemed terribly important. Hank and his boner went home in a wheelchair, and Skyler is now actively injecting herself into the laundering business. Boy did she make a quick 180 on the whole legality/morality issue. Once she was able to claim that Walt's initial seed money came from gambling and not meth, she was off and running, wasn't she?

I get it that in the heat of the moment people don't always think clearly, but if I got it right, Walt and Jesse have just crossed one of the biggest meth dealers in the states, a guy that made a phone call and declared war on the Mexican Cartel.

Mike the Cleaner's dialogue about "half-measures" was incredible. I like that guy as an actor, but man, that speech was awesome. And it appears that Walt took it to heart.

"Run."
"Jack Flack always escapes." -Davey Osborne

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