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Roody Yogurt Reviews Interactive Fiction
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Roody_Yogurt



Joined: 29 Apr 2002
Posts: 1887
Location: Milwaukee

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hallow Eve by Michael Wayne Phipps Jr.-

Mr. MWPJ had a call for a second round of betatesters for Hallow Eve, his Spring Comp entry from earlier this year. I was one of the people to answer the call. Since then, he has released the final product although it's unclear how much is different from the version I tested. For instance, this exhange is still in it:

Quote:

A ghostly skeletal hand creeps out of the black curtain which is shortly followed by a long arm, draped in black cloth. A hooded skull then emerges. What stands before you now is some tall and strange skeletal spectre that you can't explain. You are stunned to see this macabre entity, but it shows no sign of seeing you. Perhaps due to a lack of eyeballs.

It then walks to the center of the room and stands there, and slowly points to a large plastic cauldron filled with assorted candies sitting on the floor by the front door. You are in a state of disbelief. What the hell is going on here?

>get candies
You can't see any such thing.

(It only accepts >GET CANDY)

I think, if somebody is going to enjoy this game, they have to be accepting of uneven games where some aspects are better-honed than others. Let's discuss the things it does well. Well, it's kind of a fun romp. It has a couple different backstories going on. Most of the puzzles are pretty fair, parser-battling aside.

One of the things I like most is that the game isn't deviously fatal. Most of the 'bad guys' (yeah, there are several) are of the Transylvania variety, where you can stand around them indefinitely without receiving any harm (that comparison is a little unfair as some Transylvania enemies were definitely timed). The game ends up being more fun than scary.

Personally, the map is a tad larger than I would like. There's a forest just large enough to hide a couple items and make trekking through it somewhat annoying (but not impossible without a map).

"Hallow Eve" won't go on my must-play lists, but I think that people that open it should stick with it long enough to solve at least a couple of its puzzles. To that extent, it is successful popcorn fluff just like the '80s slasher films it draws its inspiration from.
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trading Punches by "Sidney Merk" for the 2004 IF Competition

I've been meaning to play this game for some years now. I probably tried to play it during the competition it was written for, but I have a serious aversion to people-have-weird-names fantasy (and sci fi). This game, unfortunately, pushed those buttons, and I was never able to get past the first scene.

Since its first release, the game was updated and its source was made public. These days, when I use my text-searching program to see if any of the Hugo game sources I have downloaded have examples of a function or routine I need help with, a Trading Punches file has as good a chance as any of popping up with an occurrence, yet I can't say this possibility-of-looking-at-its-innards gave me much familiarity when I finally pushed myself further into the game.

Implementation-wise, Trading Punches is interestingly mixed. I was impressed with verb implementation, but the game's narrative mainly is driven by its mechanics. For instance, in the first scene, despite being in the proximity of three NPCs, the only way to get them to say anything of note is to skip stones across a stream. NPC interaction mainly stays like this throughout the game but only becomes a problem when the player is especially stuck. That said, the mechanic at hand is usually fairly clear; it just may not be instantly clear to the player how important it is.

The hint system only looks at hints for the current section you are in. At one point, I opened it up, wondering if the hint system had more insight or explanation for a previous section. Based on the inaccessibility, I assume not. Still, a game that seems to pride itself on its world-building could have probably used the menu to help out with that purpose a bit more.

The multimedia is another mixed bag. I thought the graphics were a nice touch and that the game had a good look (especially after changed my interpreter's default colors to match those of the "title screens"). The songs, on the other hand, were pretty distracting and did not add much to the game. I forced myself to keep the sound on for much of it, just in case the next song ended up being great and helped develop a transitory moment, but that optimism was all for naught.

Some individual scenes had really nice pacing, and there are some memorable and fun settings. The plot isn't entirely successful, though. Reading the author's notes (http://www.sidneymerk.com/comp04/punches.shtml), one can see that he put a lot of thought into designing the game world, but he doesn't do as great a job on selling its logic to us. One character's wacky antics is explained that she joined a religion that has some sort of weird-ass tenant that you are supposed to seduce your fiance's sibling before getting married. I don't see what use any religion would have for such a tradition, but maybe if the author had described the religion as more of a cult, I might have given more leeway. Also, the protagonist becomes President or something at some point, but that doesn't stop him at all from going on all sorts of adventures all alone. I mean, it works in some kind of pulp comic book logic, but it's still rather weird. The game ends with a nice scene, but the game's oddities at all of its junctures distances the player from a real sense of continuity.

Design-wise, I thought a couple of the chapters had more rooms than they needed to but not distractingly so. The worst of them ended up having an enchanted wobblefiend (an object that helps you navigate a maze) that I wish I had found a tad earlier.

There are a couple things I like about Trading Punches that are specific to its being Hugo (besides its use of multimedia). For one thing, I admire the indentation on this thing. Hugo inherits from the awkward Inform 6 and TADS 2 era of indenting room descriptions and content listings (both Inform 7 and TADS 3 no longer seem to do this) but nothing else, which always comes across as a bit schizophrenic to me (in that incorrect-usage-of-"schizophrenic" way). As a Hugo author myself, I still haven't decided the way I want to handle this. Trading Punches, interestingly enough, goes the way of indent-everything-except-for-certain-parser-responses:

I mean, it's likely that I will stay on the no-indentations-at-all path (like I am doing with my WIP) as it is a headache to determine which responses you want to be indented and which you don't, but I respect TP (and Merk's later game, Tales of the Traveling Swordsman) for trying to make good on indentations.

Besides that, Trading Punches dives head-first into the headache of coding a dozen cups and four different liquids for filling them. Once you give one cup to an NPC, you can then refer to that cup as "NPC's cup" (and s/he won't accept a different cup from then on) or still by its color or by its contents, even. All in all, well-coded stuff.

Trading Punches bills itself as part four in a five part series. Early into the game, I thought that was a shame (that we may never see those other parts), but as I got further into it, I became more appreciative that Merk has left it for other waters. There are good ideas, but I think the next game would have to be more narratively concise- if he were to return to it- to pick up for the slack of this first game. Traveling Swordsman was a nice self-contained story, so if that's the direction he is moving in (and I do hope he writes more games), it may be all for the best.
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm trying to get in the habit of writing reviews for the IF Database ( http://ifdb.tads.org/ ) more often. Here is one I wrote for Nick Montfort's game, Book and Volume:
http://ifdb.tads.org/viewgame?id=timl7wld6zp9otsf&review=13467
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Tdarcos



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2012 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roody_Yogurt wrote:
Tdarcos, I forget what OS you use,

Windows XP Home, Professional; Windows 7 Home Premium

I have 3 machines running on my KVM. I ran out of electrical connections or I'd probably have all 4 running.
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first Doom trilogy

In 1999, Graham Nelson announced the release of several games ported to Inform. He described the original games with this:
Quote:

The central computer of Cambridge University, England, an IBM mainframe usually called "Phoenix" after its operating system, was one of those to receive "Advent" (a.k.a. "Colossal Cave") and "Zork" (a.k.a. "Dungeon") in the late 1970s. Two graduate students, Jon Thackray and David Seal, began a game called "Acheton" in 1978-9: with the aid of Jonathan Partington it expanded for another two years. Possibly the first game written outside America, by 1981 it seems likely that it was also the largest in the world (it has 403 locations). "Acheton" was written with a game assembler contemporary with Infocom's proprietory "ZIL": unlike ZIL, Seal and Thackray's game assembler was available for public use, the public in question being all users of Phoenix c. 1980-95. "Acheton" and a number of other titles migrated to commercial releases: some by Acornsoft for the BBC Micro, the local Cambridge-built microcomputer; some later by Topologika for a wide range of systems, so that these games are often called "the Topologika games". However, not all the Phoenix games had a Topologika release, nor vice versa.

So, Cambridge University had a cohesive, active hobbyist scene, fondly remembered by many, long before the rest of the world. It could be said that without Phoenix stoking Mr. Nelson’s enthusiasm for the medium, he would not have gone on to write Inform; I have no idea if that’s true, but it could be said.

Anyhow, one of these “Phoenix” games was one called Brand X, cowritten by a fellow named Peter Killworth. Killworth actually released a book on IF Theory in 1984 called “How To Write Adventure Games” (although I have yet to read it). Later on, he released a “Doom trilogy” for that previously-mentioned company, Topologika (the first game in the series, Countdown to Doom, had been previously released for the BBC Micro).

Around 1999 and 2000, unlike most IF authors from earlier eras, Killworth was very enthusiastic to partake in the (then) current IF community. He even hand-ported his own Doom games to Inform 6. Personally, I thought his commitment to the medium was incredibly admirable and was happy to have him with us. At the time, though, I only got far enough in Countdown to Doom to appreciate the few puzzles I could solve, eventually putting it down.

Years passed. At some point, I was saddened to hear that Killworth, aged 61, had passed away in 2008 from an ongoing battle with motor neurone disease.

I did eventually play the games, though. These are my thoughts.

Introducing the whole trilogy-
Years before “Doom” was associated with a hell-gate on a Martian moon, it stood for Doomawangara, a remote, dangerous planet that has been the final resting place of adventures foolish enough to seek out its treasures. Of course, in the Doom trilogy, you play just another fool in that queue, but you have advantages over those previous visitors- namely: game restarts, game saves, and unlimited UNDOs (depending on your interpreter).

The Doom trilogy is not fair by today’s standards. You will not beat the games on the first playthrough (nor the 30th, most likely), and each of the games has at least one puzzle edging on “completely insane”. Still, if you are okay with insta-deaths, mapping (including some mazes), and don’t get too ornery when you have to hit up a walkthrough (luckily, there is one for each game on the IF archive written by Richard Bos), there are enough nice, satisfying moments that I’d still recommend it to people looking for a fun, old-school distraction.

Still, it’d probably be best to give some advice on how to play these games-

1. These games continue the Phoenix tradition of not using “EXAMINE” (or any variation thereof) for looking at objects. Everything you need to know about an object is listed in its room or inventory listing.

2. Map everything, even when it costs you life to do so. The games are very much designed for trial-by-error.

3. “Rods” are supposed to be wands, I guess, and as such, they are meant to be waved.

4. There are several chemistry-related puzzles, so keep that in mind.

5. Read closely. Sometimes your one hint concerning something will be some throwaway bit of text that is printed and never mentioned again.

6. Figuring out the order of doing things is often part of the puzzle.

7. Type “HELP” early on to get an overview of any game-specific notes or commands.

Ok, let’s go into the games themselves.

Countdown to Doom-

Countdown to Doom has its share of issues working against it. Of the three, it’s the only game with an actual timer (400 moves, I think), adding an extra bit of pressure where there is enough already. The timer doesn’t end up being a huge deal, as one spends most of his or her time figuring out how to solve individual puzzles, and figuring out the most efficient order is a kind of fun last puzzle (and the timer isn’t so strict that I felt like my order-planning was even all that necessary).

There are two mazes, but all mazes in the series have a logic to them so figuring out that logic can be satisfying. Still, they will require mapping.

Speaking of mapping, CtD does the thing where exits to one location are not always the opposite direction to get back. That alone can drive me crazy, and in this case, it is exacerbated by the fact that “can’t go” messages often take up a turn (besides the aforementioned mazes, there are several areas that you only visit for a limited amount of turns, and there is annoying trial-and-error as you discover which exits are even available).

Still, the animal life (which, throughout the series, is often comprised of dinosaur-like species or other well-known tropes) and the variety of locales are interesting and imaginative enough to keep one going. There is also some usage of “action sequences” (my term, not the game’s) that are used to even better effect later in the series.

My rating-
I feel like I should only give at least three stars to games that I can recommend to any player. As such, I can only give two stars to Countdown to Doom, as I think its difficulties make it largely inaccessible to the modern IF gamer. That said, though, I’d recommend it to people looking for an engaging but challenging distraction.


Notes on this version-
I personally had to cheat at a couple points, and more so than the other games, I found variations in walkthroughs (from different versions) on the net, so if anyone would like a hint or nudge, feel free to send me an e-mail at roody.yogurt at gmail .

Maps-
For anyone who wants to cut down on the mapping (or get an idea on the amount of mapping involved), I’ve uploaded my own map, made in GUEmap 2. You can download the GUEmap version here or as a PDF here. Be warned that the map *is* spoilery, though, and it doesn’t even cover the most devious maze in the game.

Return to Doom-
Return to Doom, as one might expect, continues our adventures on Doomawangara. This time, though, it’s a rescue mission. Early on, the game is injected with death- and not just deaths of our fair protagonist- which successfully ratchets up the sense of dread. Getting to the midgame is quite an ordeal in itself.

Once there, there’s a nice Wishbringer-esque mechanic that allows the player to get past puzzles he or she otherwise can’t, but that mechanic can only be used once (and in most case, shouldn’t be used at all). Still, it’s an interesting way to inform the player of normally-inaccessible areas.

The game *must* be played with a transcript on, or at least, keep certain info available in your scrollback, as several puzzles (some horribly obscure) hinge on several facts given in one infodump (a repeatable infodump, but still). Also, there are a lot of options to explore when one gets to the midgame, and finding the areas to solve first takes a somewhat unfair amount of floundering.

On the plus side, this game has even more dinosaurs and even <spoiler>EVIL ROBOTS</spoiler>. There’s even some quite exciting action sequences, given you have the right objects to survive them. Without saying too much about it, Return to Doom adds a Floyd-like character that brings its own usefulness and personality to the table. Despite the lack of direction in the midgame, lost time spent exploring the wrong area is still decently enjoyable.

Still, Return to Doom has probably the most unforgiveable puzzles. I’ll take some time here to list the worst to save future players the trouble:

1. I seesaw what you did there. For a game series that has a fair amount of chemistry and physics (although admittedly, it doesn’t take either very seriously), I was particularly annoyed by a seesaw mechanic where you have to throw a heavy rock to the other end of the seesaw, where this rock is supposedly heavy enough to force the seesaw to propel you across a gap.

2. Oh, look, another rod! It’s not a big spoiler to say that in this game, waving the magic rod produces some oily black smoke. At least one of the locations you use it was fairly nonsensical, I thought.

3. No you tornadon’t! There is one scene where you are walking among poisonous, thorny bushes while a cyclone is approaching. Somehow, walking in the right direction protects you from getting pushed into poisonous thorns. Even with a walkthrough in hand, I couldn’t understand the logic of the scene and it was largely trial-and-error.

4. Unfair weather fiend. There is a machine with several unmarked buttons. Pushing each button will cause a weather phenomenon X turns later. Of course, this is only visible in outside locations, of which the weather-machine is not among. Worse yet, each button can only be used once.

5. Pterribly unclued. At another part, you are being attacked by a pterodactyl-esque dinosaur. The correct way to survive this encounter is to >THROW a glass disc, which is basically a CD-ROM in the game world. Completely unintuitive.

6. The Daffodil maze - At one point, you are traversing a maze of giant plants. Stay in any room for longer than a turn and you die, and there’s basically no logic as to which direction you can successfully go in. Luckily, it’s not a very large grid, but it’s still a pretty dumb part that can only be solved by trial-and-error.

7. Passwords - There are a couple passwords in the game. How one is used is adequately clued, but the other just seems to be “use on a random forcefield 20 rooms away.” If there was a clue, I missed it.

This list ended up being longer than I initially thought it would be. That said, I’d still say that, for the most part, they didn’t detract from my enjoyment too much.

Notes about the port-
Not being familiar with the original, there *were* some messages that seemed a bit like porting mistakes, including one important bit of text that was missing completely (judging by what happens afterwards, it’s easy to guess what the missing text was about). If one cared, they could play the original (which is also available for free on the IF Archive) in DOSbox. That said, I doubt it’d be worth it to be deprived of various z-code interpreters’ unlimited UNDO capabilities.

My rating-
As I did with Countdown to Doom, I can’t give this game more than two stars as I think it’ll only appeal to a certain type of player. Still, despite its weaknesses, I’d say the high points are even better than the previous game.

Mapping-
This time around, I used Trizbort to map the game. Trizbort allows for writing objects on the map and generally makes prettier maps. You can download the Trizbort file itself here or a PDF of it here. Warning: the map will contain spoilers.

Last Days of Doom-
Here we are at the final chapter of the Doomawangara trilogy. The help text describes the game as the darkest chapter yet. Maybe fittingly, the story moves the focus away from the wilds and towards Doomawangara’s civilization. Like the previous game, the intro has a fair amount of frustration but nothing that a bit of exploration and perseverance won’t solve, and exploration is a bit more lax in the midgame. Overall, this game is, by far, the fairest of the three.

It is always interesting to see narrative and characterization explored in old games, and in this case, it is done to good effect. Not only that, but there’s a nice range of puzzles and adventurous, action-packed scenes. There is not a shortage of imagination. All in all, it’s a good payoff for sticking with a difficult series.

I imagine Killworth already saw his game as making steps towards interactive-fiction-as-literature. Even the original 1990 version doesn’t keep a game score for the first time in the series. Honestly, I found myself missing scoring points when solving puzzles, but one has to respect the ambition just the same.

Gripes-
There were only a couple things that really stuck in my craw this time, like the glass enclosure that you have to >BREAK (but can’t >HIT) or some mysterious objects whose utility are only discovered by dropping.

Mapping-
Now, I mapped Countdown to Doom in GUEmap and Return to Doom in Trizbort. This time around, I made a map of LDoD in each, so people can get a idea of how the two programs compare. Personally, I think maps are quicker to throw together in GUEmap, and if you are looking to print out your maps, GUEmap will print your map out on fewer sheets of paper (it is possible to compress the PDF that Trizbort makes to use fewer sheets- at decreasing quality, of course). Trizbort, on the other hand, is somewhat more useful in its ability to list objects, and being able to have different sized shapes for rooms helps lend itself towards art-ier maps. I can’t say that I am ready to commit to one or the other. Anyhow, we have the Trizbort version (Trizbort file, Trizbort PDF )and the GUEmap version (GUEmap file, GUEmap PDF). As always, the maps contain spoilers.

Final verdict-
This last entry of the series nudges its way up to three-star territory. It still has a lot of the trial-by-error design that would prevent me from recommending it to someone with little patience, but given it largely lacks the screamingly-unfair aspects of its predecessors, I feel content to bump it up to three stars. Of course, ideally, one would have played through the earlier games to fully appreciate the overall development of the story, but I wouldn’t say it’s even particularly necessary.

Final verdict for the series itself-
As someone who enjoys both Phoenix-game-style puzzles and storytelling in IF, I am happy to have finally played through this series and seen the fine mix that it is. There were frustrations, sure, but the distraction was enjoyable enough to merit the time spent on it. Personally, I’d recommend the games to anyone who enjoys sci-fi and exploration in their IF, as long as they are ok with dying a lot. For the times that they were written, they show great foresight and are highly ambitious. I can’t imagine many people today would stick all the way through them, but I feel that those that do will be glad they did. Good job, Mr. Killworth.
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Ice Cream Jonsey



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoa, this is dynamite. Can I put it on the front page so it will show up via Planet IF?
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure, go ahead. It didn't even occur to me to put it there.
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pinback



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's what she said.
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Flack



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently tried playing a couple of old school text adventures on the C64. Both were non-memorable, and the parser was so frustrating that I now remember why I quit playing text adventures back in the day. Sure, Infocom's games were slick, but there were so many horrible ones that made the signal to noise ratio a million to one. I should make transcripts of some of them and post those.
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Endless, Nameless by NamelessAdventurer (Adam Cadre)

This write-up doesn’t aim to be a proper review. The first bit is just some hints for people who have already begun the game but are a bit stuck. The second has some thoughts about the game but doesn’t try to cover it exhaustively. I’d only recommend the second block to someone who has played most- if not all- of the game.

Gentle hints
Interestingly, early on, I determined that some of the hints at the “vacation house” were not relevant, and figuring out the replacement solution was one of my earlier (but most satisfying) accomplishments of the game. On the flipside, though, I was too quick to write off many of the other hints (and I didn’t happen upon the correct path on my own), so I’d recommend to anyone who’s stuck to pay closer attention to the hints than I did.

Overall thoughts
I think this was a very enjoyable game. It has some nicely distracting gameplay, sure, but I really like ideas it suggests. I love how the other player avatars at the vacation house are hipsters- that as time marches on, a game genre’s earnest player archetype is inevitably replaced by ones jaded by age and experience. In the vacation house, they drink White Russians, the drink indelibly associated with The Big Lebowski, which, given its longevity, is as good to blame for the modern hipster as anything else. Of course, at the house, the White Russian drink is a Rocky IV joke, but that works with the analogy, too, as Rocky IV is the kind of flawed but earnest 80s movie that has aged about as well as a BBS door game, so it makes sense that they’d be there, making fun of that, too.

The other suggested theme that I enjoyed was the importance of creativity. The hipster’s worst offense is that it is a passive, ineffectual force. Especially as represented by Lebowski enthusiasts, it is easy to see how creation gets replaced by sheer consumption (and how the in-game virtual world feels somewhat forgotten and in disrepair). Worse yet, the game suggests creative stagnation can lead to one becoming a community’s worst member, a troll. I enjoyed the sense of loss that these ideas produced.

I’m not the most critical of readers, so I feel like I misinterpret almost all games that do clever literary things. I think E,N had a lot of ideas that I just didn’t fully grasp. I think there were some points made about the imperfections of the medium (and in that regard, the pointlessness of it), and that stuff is okay but eh. The defeatist attitude doesn’t sit well with my worldview.

Mainly, I felt the game was better when it showed these things, but at some points, I felt like I was being told the way things are (in terms of players, creators, and trolls) and my gut instinct is be contrary. Adam’s a genius (compared to me, anyhow), but I’ve had this kind of problem with his games in the past. His game, Shrapnel, just out and asks the player, hey, want me to explain everything to you? I’m not sure if I’m the kind of person who’d ever have the will to say “no” and walk away, so of course, I looked at the explanation first time on my first playthrough. While some elements of the full explanation were cool, it still felt kind of disappointing just the same. The chasm between the explanation and the player’s playing experience was just too great.

Of course, E,N doesn’t explain everything the same way, but just the same, without being able to remember particular lines that irked me, I would’ve liked for the curtain to be held back a bit more. Who knows? Maybe it’s just the way that doom and gloom explanations are just so calculated (you: “<something> is so terrible!” game (all-robot-like): “Things are terrible because this is the logical conclusion of <other>.”). I dunno. I’m trying to put a finger on something which I figure that comes down to personal taste, so who knows.

Those thing I liked, though, I liked a lot, and in that regard, I think E,N is a nice love letter to creativity and youthful spirit. I’m sure some of these notions will be dispelled as more explanations make their way into the world, but I’m sure that even at the end of them, E,N will still be a game worth playing.
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Roody_Yogurt



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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Flack wrote:
I recently tried playing a couple of old school text adventures on the C64. Both were non-memorable, and the parser was so frustrating that I now remember why I quit playing text adventures back in the day. Sure, Infocom's games were slick, but there were so many horrible ones that made the signal to noise ratio a million to one. I should make transcripts of some of them and post those.


This post did actually make me break out the C64 emulator and try out some of the games on the IF Archive. I mean, I've tried them before, but there's always the nagging feeling that I may have let a good one slip through my fingers. Anyhow, I wasn't able to play many games before I had to give up since, yeah, they were pretty bad.

I think my favorite text games on the C64 back in the day were Trip To Atlantis (which is available on the IF Achive as a BASIC game) and Mission: Asteroid, mainly since they were two of of the few I ever beat. Neither are especially good from a puzzle or story angle, though.
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Flack



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PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 6:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Text adventures on the C64 were ev-ery-where. I just picked up a disk the other day (one of those magazine-style disks) and there were two on there that I couldn't find in Google. And yeah, they were horrible, both in writing and in coding.

I still haven't figured out a good way to transcribe them other than manually. Maybe I'll end up doing that.
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Lysander



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PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haha. Hiya everyone!

Rooty, if you would review my intro of Obituary sometime, that would be very nice of you. I am kind of irritated that that thing will probably never get finished but then again I could always go learn I7 myself if I cared enough, so, obviously I don't. In any case...

Tdarcos wrote:
Considering that we don't have the ability to program through voice commands,


The hell is this we shit? Look pal, until your corpulence reaches the point where the only thing you can see is your own swelling, mammoth teets, then don't go putting yourself in a group with me. Kthx.

Tdarcos wrote:
e.g., to write programs if you're not sighted, it is very hard without expensive software (or having a sighted assistant) to work on a program to run on a machine if you actually are blind.


Two things.

1:

http://www.nvda-project.org/

2: Shut it.

Seriously? Don't, like, tell me what I can't do, okay? Because you know nothing about this.

Tdarcos wrote:
Or the guy would have to find someone who is blind and run the game through him and get his comments.


Sure, but that'd never happen. Blind people are a skiddish lot, always scurrying from shadow to shadow for fear of being squashed by Big Sighted. Capturing one in the wild may be difficult; bring tranqualizers, as their bite will infect you with blind. It is known.

Tdarcos wrote:
I mean, there are a lot of things I know only as a result of being in a wheelchair that I otherwise wouldn't realize. There are also things I know as a powered wheelchair user that I did not know during the two years I was using a manual wheelchair


That's great, Paul, and exactly how much of that time did you spend being blind? You're right, up there--you don't know what it's like until you are actually in that situation. That seemed to me to be the gist of this paragraph, right? Which is fine, apart from it completely invalidating the entire rest of the goddamn post. What is, like, wrong with you?

Tdarcos wrote:
Again, considering that the amount of money available for developing a text adventure is essentially zero, someone is only going to do this because of their love of the genre. I mean, at least writing fiction has lots of paying outlets, writing interactive fiction has almost no paying outlets except perhaps for games written for cell phones and tablet computers, by purchasers interested in a text-type adventure, a very small market. Regular games have much larger markets and there is a much bigger range of targets for those apps.


Which is why there are so many mainstream games that have the thoughts of the blind in m--hahaa, just kidding. There are actually 0 mainstream games that have any interest in courting the blind community. The lazy, fat and immobilized market, on the other hand, seems to be the only demographic mainstream game developers appear to care about--lucky break! Blind people play text games because blind people can play text games. This makes them a larger percentage than normal. I don't know why you seem to think that blind people can't also love the genre, but, uh, you're wrong. About this, and so many other things.

Tdarcos wrote:
So again, given this, to be able to actually develop in such a manner that the way the game operates shows descriptions in a way that a blind person would, would require that the author find a blind person and ask them if the descriptions were good or if they would use different descriptions, presuming the person was able to do so.


Again! Yeah, it's true, blind people are very difficult communicators in person. I was born blind, understand, so I never saw how to make the mouth sounds that form human speech. I had to learn to speak in mime, which is fuckin' retarded, because I can't even see my own motions. So for all I know i'm giving everyone the jerk-off gesture when I'm just trying to say hi. What can I say, inner city school disctrict sucked.

Tdarcos wrote:
And unless they are going to pony up money out of their own pocket to do so, they'd have to get this blind person to do so for free, too.


Are you... suggesting blind slave labor? You are a truly horrible person who should have died of cyphalus . Good DAY, sir!
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Tdarcos



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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lysander wrote:
The hell is this we shit? Look pal, until your corpulence reaches the point where the only thing you can see is your own swelling, mammoth teets, then don't go putting yourself in a group with me. Kthx.


Your inability to engage in a rational discussion without resorting to personal attacks shows that your intellectual capacity, and the validity of your opinions, is zero.

I did not make any statements criticizing other people or insulting them. Your inability to do the same means that I won't even bother trying to respond to your incompetence.

I made statements about something, and if you disagreed, the answer would have been to say where you thought I was wrong, not to try to claim my opinions are wrong because I'm overweight.

Lysander wrote:
Are you... suggesting blind slave labor?

I never said any such thing and you know it. I find your vapid and sophomoric commentary to be at a minimum ridiculous and more likely, intentionally disingenuous, bordering on libel.

Lysander wrote:
You are a truly horrible person who should have died of cyphalus . Good DAY, sir!


Look who's talking. I have done nothing but state my opinions, you on the other hand have thrown ad-hominem attacks at me, and wished me dead of a horrible and sickening disease, while I have done nothing to you. If my comments make me a horrible person then your comments make you a creature I must exclude from the class of entities known as human beings, and as that creature you are at least a thousand times worse.

And yet, another example of your incompetence is shown by your misspelling of what I believe you meant, the word 'syphilis', a type of venereal disease.

I think I was wrong; I make jokes about the 'cretinous reprobates' on Caltrops. Looks like at least one has infested his inability to think upon this community.

I don't bother with and stay away from incompetents; I have enough brain damage to deal with from environmental causes; I don't need to acquire more by responding to them.
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Lysander



Joined: 08 Jul 2003
Posts: 1693
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 2:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tdarcos wrote:
Your inability to engage in a rational discussion without resorting to personal attacks shows that your intellectual capacity, and the validity of your opinions, is zero.


Okay, if you have a problem with personal attacks, then you really should leave this board because that is kind of all we do around here. But more to the point, the -point- goddamnit, which you seem to have missed despite me saying it 6 ways, is this: with that "we," you claimed yourself to be suffering from afflictions you do not in fact suffer. As one who does, I find that offensive. And DEMAND an apology!

Tdarcos wrote:
I did not make any statements criticizing other people or insulting them.


No, you just insinuated that blind people: can't use computers without someone helping them, can't type at all, are unaproachable, unable to communicate, penny pinch worse than the jews, and oh, yeah--can't love art. But that's not insulting *people*, because--
Tdarcos wrote:
your comments make you a creature I must exclude from the class of entities known as human beings, and as that creature you are at least a thousand times worse.


--We're actually inhuman. Nice, guy. Really nice.

Tdarcos wrote:
if you disagreed, the answer would have been to say where you thought I was wrong, not to try to claim my opinions are wrong because I'm overweight.


I did say where your opinions were wrong, you just chose not to quote them in the message responding to me to say you're not responding to me. What I didn't say, is "you are wrong because you are fat." What I actually said was more along the lines of, "you are fat, not blind, and also wrong about blind people. So stop pretending otherwise."

Tdarcos wrote:
I never said any such thing and you know it. I find your vapid and sophomoric commentary to be at a minimum ridiculous and more likely, intentionally disingenuous, bordering on libel.


Wow, you threaten me with lible the very next sentence after making up shit I said, that's fantastic. I'd give you a golden statue of internet douchebaggery, but fear you'd think it was delicious chocolate and hurt yourself.

Tdarcos wrote:
I have done nothing but state my opinions


You said that blind people can't code without expensive software. That is not an opinion, you were stating a fact. And it's false. Hense, I corrected you. You're welcome.

Tdarcos wrote:
And yet, another example of your incompetence is shown by your misspelling of what I believe you meant, the word 'syphilis',


Did... you seriously just... on purpose go "hurr durr that blind guy can't see the words, he is so stupid! Durr durr hurr."? You know what else is hilarious? You, trying to escape an earthquake.

Tdarcos wrote:
I don't bother with and stay away from incompetents; I have enough brain damage to deal with from environmental causes; I don't need to acquire more by responding to them.


Well you just did. Neaner neaner!
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bruce



Joined: 04 Jun 2002
Posts: 2506

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lysander wrote:

Wow, you threaten me with lible the very next sentence after making up shit I said, that's fantastic. I'd give you a golden statue of internet douchebaggery, but fear you'd think it was delicious chocolate and hurt yourself.


I've missed you, Lysander.

Bruce
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RetroRomper



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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lysander wrote:
Okay, if you have a problem with personal attacks, then you really should leave this board because that is kind of all we do around here.


Isn't the unspoken pact we have to leave Tdarcos alone, based on the fact his arguments are too easy to invalidate and numerous enough that to refute him, is a complete waste of our time?
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Lysander



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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 2:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Probably, but I don't recall signing anything. Unless someone slipped me something and signed for me while I was asleep, and that'll never stand up in court.

Besides, hey--content!
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Flack



Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Posts: 3741
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Flack wrote:
Text adventures on the C64 were ev-ery-where. I just picked up a disk the other day (one of those magazine-style disks) and there were two on there that I couldn't find in Google. And yeah, they were horrible, both in writing and in coding.

I still haven't figured out a good way to transcribe them other than manually. Maybe I'll end up doing that.


I played "African Adventure" earlier this evening. The version I played shows (c) 1985, although Abandonia has a version for the PC that was released in 1997. That version is attributed to Tony Baechler, who apparently is still active in IF circles. I believe this is Tony's blog:

http://www.inthecompanyofgrues.com

I would be curious to see how far any of you guys can get in this game without peeking at the walkthru. I read it and can't believe that anyone could possibly ever get even halfway through this game.

http://www.abandonia.com/en/games/842/African+Adventure.html
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Roody_Yogurt



Joined: 29 Apr 2002
Posts: 1887
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huh, I have both read that blog and had African Adventure for my C64. That'd be crazy if it is the same guy.

Anyhow, without looking at the walkthrough, I remember using some some smelly balm or something to get wood without being bitten by a poisonous spider, giving some trinkets to some natives (the game is kind of racist, yeah), killing the snake in the tree, and jumping over some quicksand. I remember at one point, you "escape" the game and enter a computer world. I never got more than, say, half way through the game, though.

The behind-the-curtain computer room really broke my young mind, though, as it just caught me so off-guard that this seemingly serious game (I thought the beginning quote about Dr. Livingston had such gravitas) actually didn't take itself seriously at all.

Ok, think I'll read that walkthrough now.
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